Sunday, November 15, 2009

Vibes and beats

music: Flowers From the Man Who Shot Your Cousin - Childhood

I know (almost) nothing about jazz, and because of my tone-deafness* I don't think I'll ever be able to learn much about it. But I try.

A few months ago, I was watching TVR Cultural, and there was a show about this Romanian vibraphonist**. I jotted down his name -- Alexandru Anastasiu -- and later added him on my MySpace page. I've been waiting for a concert of his in Cluj, and the waiting finally ended yesterday.

Alongside Lucian Maxim, Alexandru Anastasiu started a series of concerts under the name "fIRST bEAT, nEXT VIBE".


fIRST bEAT, nEXT VIBE basically means nu-jazz, etno inspired jazz songs and standard jazz songs. The concert in Cluj was really great; so refreshing. I feel that the earthy tones given by Lucian Maxim's beats and the celestial, dreamy tones given by Alexandru Anastasiu's vibes were the perfect mix.


Plus, it was certainly interesting to be in the Radio Hall at Radio Cluj. I've never been there before. I cannot believe yesterday morning I was actually thinking about not going to the concert anymore just because I was supposed to go alone to a place I had never been before. I would've definitely regretted it. Also, I didn't quite feet like being around a lot of ppl -- on Facebook, 150 ppl announced their presence at the concert. So imagine my surprise when I got there, ten minutes before the concert, and all the seats in the Radio hall were empty. I couldn't believe this! And I was worried that I got there too late, and that the Radio Hall would be already full and they wouldn't let any more ppl in (like it happened last week, when I wanted to go to Teodora Enache's concert at the Art Museum). In the end, around ten ppl showed up. So yeah, shame on you, Cluj (to paraphrase that lady from Conor's concert).

*Wiki says Che Guevara was tone-deaf, too ;))
** After having found out about Alexandru Anastasiu, I went to npr.org/music and looked for some vibraphone jazz: Feeling The Vibes: The Short History Of A Long Instrument.

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